Stop The Bleeding Introductory Presentation

“All too often, victims of active shooter or mass-casualty incidents bleed to death waiting for medical treatment. … Most of these shooting events are over in 15 minutes and people can bleed to death within five minutes from these severe injuries.”[1]

Unfortunately it can take more than five minutes for professional first responders to arrive at an incident scene; this is where Immediate Responders, “civilian bystanders … who perform external bleeding control for victims at the point of wounding before the arrival of professional responders”[2], are critical for victim survival. As Amateur Radio Operators we are often present at incidents where Immediate Responders may be needed During the October 2016 Business Meeting, Everett Patterson from the Fargo Fire Department will present an Introduction to their “Stop the Bleeding” training program. This presentation will discuss why the program was developed, who developed it, and what the training is for.

About Immediate Responders

One goal of the Hartford Consensus III is to empower the public to provide emergency care. During intentional mass-casualty events, those present at the point of wounding have often proven invaluable in responding to the initial hemorrhage control needs of the wounded. Traditionally thought of as “bystanders,” these immediate responders should not be considered passive observers and can provide effective lifesaving first-line treatment.

Immediate responders contribute to a victim’s survival by performing critical external hemorrhage control at the point of wounding and prior to the arrival of traditional first responders. Immediate responders contribute to what is the critical step in eliminating preventable prehospital death: the control of external hemorrhage.

The Hartford Consensus III recognizes the vital role that immediate responders play in responding to mass-casualty events. They make major contributions to improving survival from these incidents. However, the Hartford Consensus III does not advocate that members of the public enter areas of direct threat or imminent danger.

Good Samaritan laws have been effective in empowering the public to become involved in the immediate response to a victim of cardiac arrest or choking by the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the Heimlich maneuver, respectively. The Hartford Consensus recommends that these legal protections be extended to include the provision of bleeding control.[3]

About the Hartford Consensus

In April 2013, just a few months after the active shooter disaster on December 14, 2012, at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT, the Joint Committee to Create a National Policy to Enhance Survivability from Intentional Mass Casualty and Active Shooter Events was convened by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) in collaboration with the medical community and representatives from the federal government, the National Security Council, the U.S. military, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and governmental and nongovernmental emergency medical response organizations, among others. The committee was formed under the guidance and leadership of trauma surgeon Lenworth M. Jacobs, Jr., MD, MPH, FACS, vice president of academic affairs and chief academic officer at Hartford Hospital, and professor of surgery, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, to create a protocol for national policy to enhance survivability from active shooter and intentional mass casualty events. The committee’s recommendations are called the Hartford Consensus, and currently consist of four reports.[4]


[1] “Stop the Bleeding! Hartford Consensus Group Issues a Call to Action”, American College of Surgeons (ACS), last modified October 9 2013,

[2] “Information for the Public”, American College of Surgeons (ACS), accessed October 17 2016,

[3] “The Hartford Consensus III: Implementation of Bleeding Control”, American College of Surgeons (ACS), last modified July 1 2015,

[4] “The Hartford Consensus”, American College of Surgeons (ACS), accessed October 17 2016,