Content tagged with A R E S

AEN-MAR Tactical Communications Exercise

Incident and event net traffic falls into two categories: formal message traffic and tactical traffic.

Tactical traffic consists of ad hoc messages about what is happening during an incident or event. And the purpose of a tactical traffic net is to enable all participating stations to pass traffic while it is still relevant.

Efficient tactical traffic nets engage in succinct and unambiguous communication through the disciplined use of a well practiced protocol which eliminates over identification and avoids the introduction of extraneous words.

One such tactical traffic net protocol is illustrated in a Tactical Communications Exercise conducted during an AEN-MAR net. In this recording you will hear net participants practicing their tactical communication protocol as they check-in, submit their reports, and engage in discussion.

Channel bandwidth is a precious commodity on a tactical net. Remember, a tactical net intends to move “right-now” messages while they’re still relevant. Extraneous words—especially when everybody starts adding them out of habit—add up quickly to limit how much message traffic can move across the net. They especially add up during check-ins or when Net Control polls stations for reports. [The AEN-MAR Tactical Communications Exercise net activity focuses] on and exercise[s] how to hit your message and move on. Say more, clearly, with fewer words so others can get their traffic passed, too 1

CERT Training In Fargo

CERT Triage

CERT Triage City of Fargo, ND

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations.” [ 1 ] “CERT training provides life saving skills and techniques for people who will rely on each other for help in the time of need” [ 2 ] and can be a useful addition to the skill sets of Amateur Radio operators engaged in providing Public Service Communication support.

Introducing AREDN

Our served agencies are accustomed to utilizing direct (i.e. person-to-person) and virtually instantaneous communications to conduct their operations. These means of communication (e.g. the telephone, email with attachments, and instant messaging through a wide variety of platforms) depend upon extensive, and often fragile, infrastructure which can be disrupted during incidents ranging in scale from a localized fiber-optic cable cut to regional severe weather events.

As past FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate, KK4INZ, said in Ham Radio Now Emcomm Extra #8, when an incident occurs “they just want their email to work.”

Traditional public service (aka Emcomm) messaging often does not meet the expectations of today’s served agencies (our customers). Amateur Radio operator typically utilize indirect communication paths with paper forms for origination / delivery and transcription style transfer methods (e.g. voice or CW); this does not provide the style of communication preferred by our customers.