Content tagged with A R E S

Stop The Bleeding Introductory Presentation

“All too often, victims of active shooter or mass-casualty incidents bleed to death waiting for medical treatment. … Most of these shooting events are over in 15 minutes and people can bleed to death within five minutes from these severe injuries.”[1]

Unfortunately it can take more than five minutes for professional first responders to arrive at an incident scene; this is where Immediate Responders, “civilian bystanders … who perform external bleeding control for victims at the point of wounding before the arrival of professional responders”[2], are critical for victim survival. As Amateur Radio Operators we are often present at incidents where Immediate Responders may be needed

Amateur Radio-Military Interoperability Exercise

An Amateur Radio-military interoperability exercise will take place October 31 and November 1. The event will begin at 1200 UTC on October 31 and continue through 2359 UTC on November 1 on 60 meter channels 1-4—5.3305 MHz, 5.3465 MHz, 5.357 MHz, and 5.3715 MHz, respectively.

During this exercise, military stations will attempt to make radio contact with stations in as many of the 3007 US counties as possible. Radio amateurs providing “county status” information will receive a US Department of Defense “interoperability QSL card.”

Contact the Military Auxiliary Radio Service (MARS) for more information.

(From: ARRL: Amateur Radio-Military Interoperability Exercise Set for October 31-November 1)

Simulated Emergency Test

September is National Preparedness Month. Every year in September ARRL encourages ARES, RACES, and SKYWARN leaders to plan a Simulated Emergency Test (SET). In their effort to be as prepared as possible to provide auxiliary communications if needed during a disaster, the RRRA ARES group has planned informal nets Sunday, October 2nd , and Monday, October 3rd on VHF and HF bands with relays between these bands handled by the net controllers.